Google Data Studio Training

Sharing

Sharing

Introduction Sharing is probably one of the most useful functions of Google Data Studio. For many years, we shared a copy of a spreadsheet or slide presentation, they didn't have any sync function or collaboration whatsoever. Google Data Studio, works on Google Cloud Platform. Users can login with their Google accounts or - if set - thru public links. These connections done online and at the same time several people might view the report with different filter options. How to share To share, view the asset you want to share, then in the upper right, use the Share menu: Invite people to...

Community Visualisations

Community Visualisations

Introduction Data Studio community visualizations allow anyone to build, use, and share custom visualizations in Google Data Studio. So they are charts created by third-party developers that work with your data and can be configured just like Data Studio's default charts. These elements are essentially graphs, tables and filters for data. You can mix and match visual components to create custom dashboards that work in Data Studio just like the native visual elements. | “Data Studio community visualizations allow you to create and integrate custom JavaScript components into your dashboards. You can use community visualizations to expand your chart selection,...

Pivot Tables

Pivot Tables

Introduction This pivot table of grouped values shows the sums, averages, or other statistics of all the individual items in a more extensive table. Pivot tables can be created by using pivot charts to rearrange information. |   Pivot tables, take the rows in a standard table and pivot them so they become columns. This lets you group and summarize the data in ways a standard table can't provide. Example: The following is a standard table listing the Revenue Per User metric by calendar quarter and year:   While this table is useful for showing which country received the most revenue per user...

Tables

Tables

Introduction Tables display your data in a grid of rows and columns. Each column represents a dimension or metric, while each row is one record of your data. Tables are staple charts of Google Data Studio. They might not look appealing or attractive compared to other charts. But they will show all the "bones" of your data and they are really useful to troubleshoot any data source related issues. They summarize your data. Rows in the table displays the summary for each unique combination of the dimensions included in the table definition. Metrics in the table is summarized according to...

Treemaps

Treemaps

Introduction In computing and information visualization, treemaps are a way of displaying hierarchical data with nested rectangles. Each branch of the tree is given a rectangle, which is then tiled with smaller rectangles representing sub-branches. Data in a treemap is displayed in "branches" (also called "nodes"). Each branch can have zero or more sub-branches, and one parent branch (except for the root, which has no parents). Each branch is displayed as a rectangle, sized and colored according to the values in your data. Sizes and colors are valued relative to all other branches in the graph. Example; Imagine that our...

Bullet Charts

Bullet Charts

Introduction Bullet charts shows a single metric. They help you to see how good is selected metric performing and they do it in a simple, easy to ready way. A center bar showing the actual value of the metric you are graphing A vertical line showing a target value Colored bands that represent threshold ranges, such as poor, average, and good Bullet charts are often used in dashboards to provide meter or gauge-like widgets that monitor various "health" or performance KPI (key performance indicators). Example; This chart shows number of sessions in a website (67500). Target has set to 70K,...

Scatterplot & Bubble Charts

Scatterplot & Bubble Charts

Introduction Scatterplot & Bubble charts are for comparing variable according to relationships between them. Charts might have points or circles. Charts have X and Y axis. Scatter charts in help see the relationship between 2 metrics for up to 3 dimensions. For example, a scatter chart can show if there's a correlation between ad spend and conversion rate for a specific campaign, letting you answer questions such as "Do more expensive ads result in better conversions?" Bubble charts show data with 3 dimensions. It's similar to a scatter plot where the first 2 dimensions are the horizontal (X) and vertical...